​​​​The goal: To give more cats and dogs an opportunity to be adopted and to free up space in the kennels for more animals

As part of the measures being taken in the Ministry of Agriculture in favor of animal welfare, and in an effort to encourage adoption while giving every animal the chance to find a new home, the Ministry of Agriculture is updating the procedure regulating the delivery of the cats and dogs for adoption from municipal kennels and from the animal welfare non-profits. The main impact of this update will be the halving of the mandatory retention period for cats and dogs in the kennels. The goal: To give more cats and dogs an opportunity to be adopted and to free up space in the kennels for more animals.

The rapid proliferation of animals in Israel strains the ability of the authorities and the animal welfare organizations to address all the homeless dogs currently roaming around Israel. As a result, and in order to provide a temporary solution, some of these animals are sent to temporary facilities unsuitable for long-term stays. However, this rapid rate of multiplication makes it difficult to provide a suitable solution for all the homeless dogs in Israel. 

Therefore, in order to be able to find a home for every animal and to encourage adoption while reducing the chances of diseases being transmitted, primarily rabies, and considering the improved tracking capability through tagging and registration, the Ministry of Agriculture is updating the procedure regulating this practice. Under the updated procedure, the Ministry of Agriculture has reduced the time cats and dogs put up for adoption will be required to be held in kennels. The duration has been cut from 30 days to just 15 before they can be delivered for adoption. The two-week stay is intended to ensure the animal is healthy, that it is fit for adoption and that there is no owner looking for it. At the same time, cats and dogs arriving at the kennels from “at-risk” areas will be kept in kennels, where they will be under daily supervision of a veterinarian, for a period of no less than 45 days before being put up for adoption, in order to ensure that they are free of rabies in its incubation stage.

Dr. Deganit Ben-Dov, who is in charge of the animal cruelty prevention law at the veterinary services in the Ministry of Agriculture: “The Ministry of Agriculture is doing its best to ensure the welfare of the animals, while at the same time safeguarding their health and the health of the public at large. Within these parameters, the Ministry is taking another significant step which will help more animals find a home”.